Training and Education

The Utah Suicide Prevention Coalition and the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health are committed to training and education on curriculum that can help communities build capacity for effective suicide prevention. The following trainings represent the commitment to training reflected in the Utah Suicide Prevention as well as priorities in the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention.

  • Question Persuade, Refer (QPR): Website
    QPR stands for Question, Persuade, and Refer — 3 simple steps that anyone can learn to help save a life from suicide. Just as people trained in CPR and the Heimlich Maneuver help save thousands of lives each year, people trained in QPR learn how to recognize the warning signs of a suicide crisis and how to question, persuade, and refer someone to help. QPR can be learned in our Gatekeeper course in as little as one hour.
  • Mental Health First Aid: Website
    Mental Health First Aid is an 8-hour course that teaches you how to help someone who is developing a mental health problem or experiencing a mental health crisis. The training helps you identify, understand, and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders.
  • ASIST- Applied Suicide Intervention Skills: Website
    Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) is a two-day intensive, interactive and practice-dominated course designed to help clinical, non-clinical caregivers and parents recognize and review risk, and intervene to prevent the immediate risk of suicide. It is by far the most widely used, acclaimed and researched suicide intervention training workshop in the world. Trainers are certified by Living Works, Inc. as accomplished practitioners in suicide prevention, intervention and postvention.
  • Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale: Website
    The C-SSRS is a questionnaire used to assess the full range of evidence based suicidal ideation and behavior with criteria for next steps. The C-SSRS can be used across various settings including primary care, clinical practice, military setting, correction facilities and more. For more information and for training on use of the C-SSRS click here.
  • Stanley Brown Safety Plan: Website
    Suicidal thoughts can seem like they will last forever – but for many, these thoughts and feelings pass. Having a plan in place that can help guide you through difficult moments can make a difference and keep you safe. Ideally, such a plan is developed jointly with your counselor or therapist. It can also be developed with a Lifeline counselor who can help you write down actions to take and people to contact in order to feel safe from suicide. In general, a safety plan is designed so that you can start at step one and continue through the steps until you feel safe. You should keep your plan in a place where you can easily access it (your wallet or cell phone) when you have thoughts of hurting yourself.